Raffaele Marchetti

Latest by Raffaele Marchetti

The Nature of the Protests in Hong Kong

Raffaele Marchetti, Professor of International Relations, LUISS University, Italy, specially for wpfdc.org

Once again street protests and harsh confrontation with the government. Once more the acronym already used many times in the movement “Occupy.” Again governments who fear destabilization from outsiders.

The protests going on in the Special Administrative Region of Hong Kong have a triple face. On the one hand they are the result of political dynamics internal to the People’s Republic of China, although arising from the legacy of the long period under the British Crown. On the other are linked in many ways to the demonstrations occurred in recent years in many parts of the world. A third dimension, which remains underexplored so far, relates to the wider policies of international democracy promotion.

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EU Democracy Promotion through Civil Society

Raffaele Marchetti, Professor of International Relations, LUISS University, Italy, specially for wpfdc.org

This is the second of a short series of articles on democracy promotion. The topic has been picked up because of its increasingly controversial nature in international politics. In the first two pieces, the democracy promotion policy carried out by the US and the EU are analyzed. In the remaining articles, a more comparative and critical examination will be developed.

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The Social Costs of the EU-Russia Split

Raffaele Marchetti, Professor of International Relations, LUISS University, Italy, specially for wpfdc.org

There is a big discussion about the high costs that EU Member States and Russia are going to pay as the result of the current waves of sanctions and countermeasures related to the Ukrainian crisis. Currently, the EU exports to Russia € 140 billion, conversely Russia exports to the EU around €180 billion. It is difficult to predict the precise amount of trade that will be lost but it is clear that sanctions on one side, and announce plan for import substitutions on the other will definitely damage the economic intercourse between the two partners.

What has been much less discussed are the social costs attached to the current crisis. They do not occupy the front pages of the newspapers, they are less apparent, but, I would argue, more profound and persistent. And, as a consequence, definitely more worrying.

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The Nature of the EU and Its External Projection

Raffaele Marchetti, Professor of International Relations, LUISS University, Italy, specially for wpfdc.org

What is the EU? This is a question that has occupied the debate in the European Union and beyond for many years. Of course the political significance of the question is high because it constitutes a precondition for interpreting its foreign policy action and hence to understand its role in global politics.

One way of addressing the question would simply be to associate the EU to the American superpower. The EU as the closer (and relatively loyal) ally of the US would be the answer. This way, however, the agency of the EU, its autonomy, would be denigrated, if not denied altogether. And yet, there have been hints of a EU autonomous political agency. It is for this reason that we cannot be satisfied with a simplistic response in terms of bandwagoning with the US.
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US Democracy Promotion through Civil Society

Raffaele Marchetti, Professor of International Relations, LUISS University, Italy, specially for wpfdc.org

This is the first of a short series of articles on democracy promotion. The topic has been picked up because of its increasingly controversial nature in international politics. In the first two pieces, the democracy promotion policy carried out by the US and the EU are analyzed. In the remaining articles, a more comparative and critical examination will be developed.
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The Eurozone Crises and the Contestation of the Europeanist Hegemony

Raffaele Marchetti, Professor of International Relations, LUISS University, Italy, specially for wpfdc.org

The history of the European integration has been characterized by a widespread consensus in the political elites of the member states. EU leaders have for the most part shared a feeling of overall support for a gradual economic integration at the regional level. At times, such support was almost unquestioned, leading to a “quasi-delegation” of decision-making power to technocratic elites. The expression of “permissive consensus” was coined to describe this situation of de facto cession of sovereignty to supranational technocrats.

The situation changed for the first time with the Maastricht Treaty in 1993. With the restatement of the goal of the political union, the treaty indirectly generated the debate on the democratic deficit of the EU and more generally on the increasing politicization of the regional integration process. From that moment on, the previously de-politicized process of the EU integration became more contentious. A number of consequences derived from such shift, including the strengthening of the European Parliament and the inclusion of the topic of civil society participation into the EU agenda.

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Postglobalization: Six Scenarios

Raffaele Marchetti, Professor of International Relations, LUISS University, Italy, specially for wpfdc.org

In the dreams of the most hardliner hyper globalists, the ultimate stage of mankind evolution coincides with a world system that is perfectly integrated in all of its dimensions: a system with a single global market, a single jurisprudence and a single world supreme court, and a single political-institutional system. Analytically, already in 1969 Deutsch held that “societal borders dissolve when there is no more critical reduction in the frequency of social transaction” (Deutsch, 1969, 99). This is the stage that hyper globalists would like to reach. Are we proceeding through this path? The answer is not univocal.

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Worries about the Recent Military Announcements of Germany and Japan

Raffaele Marchetti, Professor of International Relations, LUISS University, Italy, specially for wpfdc.org

In the recent months both Germany and Japan announced the intention to reinvigorate their military performances. Given their past record and their prolonged disengagement from military operations, the announcements were received with apprehensive surprise.

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Street Politics: Power Back to the Square

Raffaele Marchetti, Professor of International Relations, LUISS University, Italy, specially for wpfdc.org

In the last three years we have witnessed a return of the street politics, or we should better call it “square politics”. The results of this new square politics have been astonishing: presidents, prime ministers, and head of states have been forced to resign by the people’s pressure from below. While the subsequent state of affairs has not always been better or simply more stable, the mere fact of having protest demonstrations so forcefully influencing institutional politics constitutes a novelty in the more recent political landscape.

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